The aiki.wiki FAQ

What is aiki.wiki?


aiki.wiki is a platform for building a trusted, credible, and mutually resolving consensus online. An online library for full trusted media completely resolved through online collaborative editing.

Through the process of  negotiating an ‘aiki.wiki’ on the platform,  a shared narrative is published as a main article in the library, called the ‘aiki atheneum’.

Specifically, aiki.wiki allows for a true, rational, and collaborative consensus on any topic, subject, problem or inquiry through its very unique discussion algorithm that rewards permissions based on collaborative and rational behaviors.

The result is a fully trusted, transparently vetted article that can be distributed on the web while it builds further consensus.

How does aiki.wiki work?

By applying an algorithm to users behaviors and choices while they assign three unique contexts in each exchange in a consensus building process.

Through that process, an article organically gets published and users whose behaviors show collaboration, honest self reflection and rational thinking are awarded editing permissions on the article published from the discussion.

This is all accomplished programmatically.

Why do you say it produces ‘mutual resolution’?

Resolution is the only logical outcome of an aiki.wiki discussion.

Editing permissions are won in pairs between two conflicting editors.

The algorithm literally alters the focus in a heated consensus so users are rewarded for acknowledging the shortcomings of their own assignments just as much as they can consistently argue against someone else’s.

This changes the argument into a mutually beneficial ‘game’, where admitting errors in assignments allow a user to win a permission just as much as anything else.

It can only fail to produce a resolution if people choose not to complete the discussion and leave.

As long as they stay inside of the discussion, resolution is the only result that can logically happen.

Since the discussion itself is what generates, edits, and refines the article, users are likely to stay inside of the discussion so they can influence the output.

Additionally, if one user chooses to leave the discussion and their specific argument open before resolution, another user can come in and easily take up their space in the consensus.

So if you have two sides in a dispute that are very extreme, say political or religious points of view, is a resolution still to be expected?

Yes.

No matter what point of view or group exists in a collaborative, each point of view is going to have a segment of their adherents who tend to be more rational initially than others.

This segment could be minuscule, small or large, it does not matter. It only takes one rational individual to alter a consensus between many people on aiki.wiki.

aiki wiki makes sure that the rational parties in each ideological conflict ‘find each other’ and the consensus builds from there.

How can aiki.wiki determine if someone is ‘rational’?

The platform doesn’t really indentify if ‘users’ are rational, just if their behaviors are. Rational behaviors from a set of choices are actually easy to identify.

Rational ideas, however, and irrational ones – are very much identifiable, and these ideas get broken down and contextualized properly.

Ultimately, all a user needs to be recorded as ‘rational’ in aiki.wiki is the ability of that user to simply just be honest in a discussion. If they are honest, all of their responses in consensus building will show rational behaviors.

Additionally, discussing from a rational viewpoint does not mean having all of the correct answers, sometimes it also means that a user has all of the right questions. More often than not, it also means that user can accept their own missed assignments and change them accordingly. A clear indicator of a rational event is when a user acknowledges not when they are right, but when they are mistaken.

So voting algorithms, like thumbing up or down, liking, etc are not applied in aiki.wiki?

Voting up or down is never used to determine a rational consensus or the outcome of a consensus.

Voting is inherently flawed, so while voting is an open democratic process that gives everyone a voice is a sign of a more open and civil society, it does not necessarily insure that what is voted to the top is accurate, trustworthy, dependable, etc. (see 2016 election)

Voting is still allowed, however, to occur on aiki.wiki, it is not something that is suppressed.

Thumbing up or down is still valuable information in a consensus process, it informs a rational consensus of the personal side of the process.

So users can still have a ‘human’ discussion, and not be forced to discuss programmatically,  or in legalese like attorneys?

Yes. aiki.wiki allows for lively discussion, especially humor, to take place. aiki.wiki is fun and natural.

What is unique about aiki.wiki is not just how it can produce a rational consensus, but also how users can use and appreciate creativity, subjectivity, and personal expression and how important those voices also are in a consensus process.

How does aiki.wiki remove trolling, harassment, or deception used in a consensus process?

aiki.wiki is designed under certain principles.

It does not seek to change the user’s behavior, just change the environment the user is in.

It follows the principle that if there exists a rational environment for the free exchange of ideas, then people will naturally adjust their behavior to the environment.

aiki.wiki does this by allowing one narrative or article to flow through three different types of forums.

Each forum teases through different types of discussions and different types of user behaviors.

So where discussions become critical and require rational resolution aiki.wiki naturally filters it through one forum, while discussions that erupt into personal attacks, ridiculous arguments, or even just personal commentary are filtered through another.

What is organizing the whole process are the individual choices made by individual editors and applying it as a collective result published as an article.

So aiki.wiki just makes it impossible for trolls to compete in a rational consensus or gain consensus where none is warranted.

Everyone can make their own choices how they choose to communicate in an aiki.wiki.

Can aiki.wiki be ‘gamed’?

That is actually the point of aiki.wiki, to ‘gamify’ critical discussion.

As a game, it is more similar to chess, and less similar to games that require deception, like poker. However, unlike both of those games, aiki.wiki is a non zero sum game.

If someone attempts to alter the algorithm, they are going to find that it is much easier to game the discussion the way aiki.wiki allows rather than to game the discussion by introducing deception into the stratagem of the discussion.

Barack Obama has now mentioned the necessity of something like aiki.wiki for the poisoned media landscape. aiki wiki is an idea whose time has come.

Bill Maher just interviewed Obama and Obama talks about this necessity around the 15:00 mark.

What is the aiki atheneum?

The atheneum is a collaborative library that contains all of the published resolutions reached in a consensus through aiki wiki.

How is that like Wikipedia?

It is not like Wikipedia. Wikipedia is an encyclopedia, while aiki atheneum is a library.

For example, Wikipedia itself can be one component in the atheneum, and Wikipedia editors could use aiki wiki to arrive at a stronger consensus and article on Wikipedia.

aiki wiki is not a competitive platform, it is not seeking to replace anything, just improve everything.

Where is it?

You can visit us while we are still getting up and running at http://aiki.wiki.

So far just the prototype for the atheneum is coded, and I have about three months of coding to complete phase one of aiki.wiki.

When will it be completed?

I’m hoping soon, I haven’t much free time to work on it and I am funding it myself. There is still so much work to be completed on this project.

So why is it up now?

It was not my intention to release any information about this project yet but because of online harassment on RationalWiki, it has become somewhat necessary.

I had to pause a Kick Starter campaign because of it. How could I launch a campaign to raise money for aiki wiki when there is another campaign warning people online that I am a crank and that aiki wiki is ‘pseudoscience’? That is a very risky hurdle to overcome in launching a crowd funding campaign, and utterly discredits me and attempts to paint of picture of me that is not who I am or what this project is.

Honestly, speaking as a creator and entrepreneur, it’s been a little heartbreaking that I have to overcome this narrative about me ill applied by individuals harassing me.

aiki wiki has figured into the background of Wikipedia, We Have a Problem, why?

Wikipedia We Have a Problem grew from me just researching for aiki.wiki. In both wiki wars that I involved myself in, I adhered to ‘rules of engagement’ formulated in aiki wiki, and I wanted to see how that outcome would play out in a hostile environment on a platform that is not suited for social interaction.

Additionally, my fascination with ‘wiki wars’ and my own wiki idealism was the conclusion of my TEDx talk, “Google Consciousness”, where I noted that Israeli and Palestinian Wikipedia editors were able to build shared narratives, a feature of what I believe will be social media evolving to replace government as we use it today, alluding to something like an ‘aiki wiki’.

What was OS 0 1 2?

aiki wiki is somewhat derived from a very experimental, and very fun viral media project I co-created  fifteen years ago in 2002 called OS 0 1 2.

OS 0 1 2 was one of a small handful of viral media projects I created or experimented with during those years.

It was an essay that was collaboratively written online in a very organic manner, literally by copying and pasting emails and forum texts into a web page manually. It was nothing more than a tongue in cheek ‘meta’ joke that were instructions for how the essay should be rationally discussed.

It originated from AOL message boards online protests about the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq leading up to the invasion of Iraq in 2003. At the time, I participated with others in the creation of an online character called “Bubblefish” the “Flame Warrior”, performing theater, and confronting pro war “trolls” on many forums.

Through confronting online trolls or bullies, we all wound up very organically creating in some ways a pretty profound document, which just followed it’s own rules for it’s authorship.

It has been offline for a few years, but the last ‘updated’ OS is available here.

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